Clocks

Clocks - Body

Look Closely

A decorative clock made of brass, steel, and rope shown on a brown wooden wall mount on a white wall. Two long hanging brass pendulums are visible against the wall.

Benjamin Hill, Lantern Clock, ca. 1650, brass, steel, and rope. Gail-Oxford Collection. The Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens.

A front-view of a gilt-bronze clock featuring floral designs, cherubs, and an oval portrait of Archbishop Maximilian of Cologne above the round clock face.

Mantel Clock, 1782–1783, Sevres Porcelain Manufactory, gilt bronze, porcelain, glass, enamel, brass, steel, painting on ivory. The Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens.

A teal and lime green vertical bar on the left that says “Time to sort!” with a light green and light purple venn diagram in the middle where one circle says “Lantern Clock,” one says “Mantel Clock,” and the middle says “Both.”

Review the terms that describe both images. Which facts go in the same area of the diagram? Which facts go in each different area of the diagram?

  • Painted ivory
  • Decorative arts
  • American
  • French
  • 1782-1783
  • Columns
  • Brass
  • Roman numerals
  • Gilt bronze
  • Rope
  • Made for a prince
  • "Chamber"
  • Clock
  • The Huntington's Collection
  • ca. 1650
  • Symbol of wealth
  • Steel
  • Hung
  • Porcelain
  • Pendulum
  • Floral design

A teal and lime green vertical bar on the left that says “Answers” with a light green and light purple venn diagram in the middle where one circle says “Lantern Clock,” one says “Mantel Clock,” and the middle says “Both” and the answers listed in each.

Answers

Lantern Clock

  • American
  • ca. 1650
  • "Chamber"
  • Floral design
  • Rope
  • Pendulum
  • Hung

Both

  • Steel
  • Symbol of wealth
  • Roman numerals
  • Decorative arts
  • The Huntington's collection
  • Brass
  • Clock

Mantel Clock

  • Porcelain
  • Made for a prince
  • Painted ivory
  • French
  • Columns
  • Gilt bronze
  • 1782-1783

Learn about the clocks

A decorative clock made of brass, steel, and rope shown on a brown wooden wall mount on a white wall. Two long hanging brass pendulums are visible against the wall.

  • This type of clock is called a lantern clock because it is said to look like a lantern. Do you think it looks like a lantern?
  • Lantern clocks were originally from England and then became popular in America.
  • This clock has a pendulum, which is a weight that swings back and forth to help control the clock’s movement. What sound do you think this clock makes?
  • The clock’s design features dolphins and flowers.
  • Zoom in to the lantern clock.
A front-view of a gilt-bronze clock featuring floral designs, cherubs, and an oval portrait of Archbishop Maximilian of Cologne above the round clock face.

  • This mantel clock is made of porcelain (a white clay that has been fired in a kiln, or oven, at a very high temperature for pottery) and gilt bronze.
  • A mantel is a ledge on top of a fireplace.
  • Above the clock is a portrait of Archbishop Maximilian of Cologne (brother to Marie-Antoinette of France).
  • The clock also features paintings of flowers, cherubs (baby angels), and a rooster.
  • Watch two short videos about the front and back of the clock.
  • Zoom in to the mantel clock.

Questions

  • What did you notice about object 1, Lantern Clock?
  • What did you notice about object 2, Mantel Clock?
  • How are they the same?
  • How are they different?
  • What did you learn?
  • Which clock do you like best? Why?

Activity

Tell the time without saying the time

Materials: Paper and tools for drawing

Time: 10 minutes

Steps:

  1. Draw a clock shape and mark the places for 12, 3, 6, and 9.
  2. In each place, draw an image or a symbol that tells the time without saying the time. For example, since 12 is lunchtime, you could draw your lunch at the top of the clock in the 12 position. What happens during the day that could be a symbol for the other times on the clock?
  3. Draw the hour and minute hands at your favorite time of day.

We would love to see your work!

Please take a picture of your Venn diagram. Then post it on social media and tag The Huntington! #LearnAtTheH