Vases

Vases - Body

Look Closely

A watercolor drawing of a light blue vase decorated with two white moths and a bee, a row of orange poppies across the middle, and a row of small yellow and white daisies at the base of the vase.

Design for a Vase, no date, Morris and Company (British, 1861–1940), watercolor on paper. The Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens.

White porcelain vase with a red, blue, and yellow floral design resting on top of a gilt bronze pedestal.

Vase, 1368–1644, Chinese, porcelain. The Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens.

A teal and lime green vertical bar on the left that says “Time to sort!” with a light green and light purple venn diagram in the middle where one circle says “Design for a Vase” one says “Vase,” and the middle says “Both.”

Review the terms that describe both images. Which facts go in the same area of the diagram? Which facts go in each different area of the diagram?

  • Porcelain
  • Watercolor
  • Butterflies
  • Bird
  • Paper
  • Morris and Company
  • Two-dimensional
  • White, blue, red
  • Flowers
  • No date
  • Decorated
  • The Huntington's collection
  • Three-dimensional
  • Chinese
  • British
  • Design
  • Ming dynasty
  • Decorative arts
  • Vase
  • 1368-1644
  • Bronze

A teal and lime green vertical bar on the left that says “Answers” with a light green and light purple venn diagram in the middle where one circle says “Design for a Vase,” one says “Vase,” and the middle says “Both” and the answers listed in each.

Answers

"Design for a Vase"

  • Two-dimensional
  • British
  • Butterflies
  • Morris and Company
  • Design
  • No date
  • Paper
  • Watercolor

Both

  • Decorated
  • Flowers
  • White, blue, red
  • The Huntington's collection
  • Vase

"Vase"

  • Bronze
  • 1368-1644
  • Chinese
  • Decorative arts
  • Three-dimensional
  • Ming dynasty
  • Bird
  • Porcelain

Learn about the vases

A watercolor drawing of a light blue vase decorated with two white moths and a bee, a row of orange poppies across the middle, and a row of small yellow and white daisies at the base of the vase.

  • This vase is actually a watercolor drawing of a design for a vase. On this vase, there are flowers, butterflies, and even a bumblebee!
  • This drawing is part of a set of two vase designs. You can see the other drawing here.
  • The maker of this design was Morris and Company, a company known for designs for wallpaper and fabric.
  • Why do you think this drawing was created? Do you think it was an idea for an actual three-dimensional vase?
  • Zoom in to this drawing.
White porcelain vase with a red, blue, and yellow floral design resting on top of a gilt bronze pedestal.

  • This vase is part of a set of two vases. You can see the other vase here.
  • This vase was made in China during the Ming dynasty (1368–1644). The gilt bronze pedestal (bottom mount) was added in France during Louis XVI’s rule (1774–1792).
  • Who do you think created this vase? What makes you think that?
  • The material of this vase is porcelain, which is a white clay that has been fired in a kiln (oven) at a very high temperature.
  • Who do you think would have owned this vase? What makes you think that?
  • Zoom in to this vase.

Questions

  • What did you notice about object 1, Design for a Vase?
  • What did you notice about object 2, Vase?
  • How are they the same?
  • How are they different?
  • What did you learn?
  • Which vase do you like best? Why?

Activities

Fill the vase

Materials: Paper and tools for drawing

Time: 10 minutes

Steps:

  1. Pick one of the vases and draw it.
  2. Then draw what you would put inside. Flowers? Rocks? Leaves? Sticks? Think about why you would put these items in this vase.

We would love to see your work!

Please take a picture of your Venn diagram. Then post it on social media and tag The Huntington! #LearnAtTheH